California Drought: website_drought_lkm_005

Dead cabbage leaves rot in a field on Potrero Nuevo Farm Oct. 30, 2014 in Half Moon Bay, Calif. In 2008 Bill Laven and his wife Christine Pielenz bought land and founded Potrero Nuevo Farm in Half Moon Bay with the intention of donating a vast majority of the produce to charity and fostering agricultural education with local youth. Up until this year, the farm was donating about 80 percent of its produce to charity. As the California drought worsened, Laven began to discover their wells and springs were all but drying up. In the summer he found that wells and a spring that were once pulling in over 1,000 gallons of water a day were now pulling in barely 100 gallons. The couple had no other option but to close the farm in July. Most of the vegetables were allowed to die, fields went dry and cattle that were grazing the land leased by a rancher had to be removed.

Dead cabbage leaves rot in a field on Potrero Nuevo Farm Oct. 30, 2014 in Half Moon Bay, Calif. In 2008 Bill Laven and his wife Christine Pielenz bought land and founded Potrero Nuevo Farm in Half Moon Bay with the intention of donating a vast majority of the produce to charity and fostering agricultural education with local youth. Up until this year, the farm was donating about 80 percent of its produce to charity. As the California drought worsened, Laven began to discover their wells and springs were all but drying up. In the summer he found that wells and a spring that were once pulling in over 1,000 gallons of water a day were now pulling in barely 100 gallons. The couple had no other option but to close the farm in July. Most of the vegetables were allowed to die, fields went dry and cattle that were grazing the land leased by a rancher had to be removed.