California Drought: website_drought_lkm_003

Lea Markegard, 12, cuddles with her lamb Cottonball on the kitchen floor of her family's home Nov. 4, 2014 in Half Moon Bay, Calif. After the lamb was the only one of a set of triplets rejected by its mother, Lea took on the responsibility of raising it. The Markegards started their grass-fed business nine years ago on 1,000 acres of land they’ve leased for years in Half Moon Bay. The couple also have four children that they home school. As the drought worsened, they saw their 16 water sources shrink to just one. They’ve had to move their 4-500 head of cattle to land leased off the property because all of the water sources on their land have dried up, including the spring that used to provide water for their home. Now they have to haul in water for their family once about every three weeks. “We watch every drop,” said Doniga about their water conservation. If the drought does not let up, the couple will be forced to sell the herd they’ve been building for 10 years.

Lea Markegard, 12, cuddles with her lamb Cottonball on the kitchen floor of her family's home Nov. 4, 2014 in Half Moon Bay, Calif. After the lamb was the only one of a set of triplets rejected by its mother, Lea took on the responsibility of raising it. The Markegards started their grass-fed business nine years ago on 1,000 acres of land they’ve leased for years in Half Moon Bay. The couple also have four children that they home school. As the drought worsened, they saw their 16 water sources shrink to just one. They’ve had to move their 4-500 head of cattle to land leased off the property because all of the water sources on their land have dried up, including the spring that used to provide water for their home. Now they have to haul in water for their family once about every three weeks. “We watch every drop,” said Doniga about their water conservation. If the drought does not let up, the couple will be forced to sell the herd they’ve been building for 10 years.